Letter from the Editor

Part of the Process
DelynnEllisPhotoNew

 

  Many readers who flip through this issue of Glass Patterns Quarterly will be able to size up from the opening page photo whether our GPQ featured projects are complex or simple, costly or inexpensive. A well-trained eye combined with experience in a glass studio gives us all a better appreciation for the intricacies of artistry when we see it. But what about those with an untrained eye or little to no glass experience? I’m talking about your potential customers and/or new students. Can they also appreciate the endeavors that go into creating glass art?
  At Glass Patterns Quarterly, we see firsthand the complicated steps that go into a glass tutorial. Sometimes we have more than 30 steps to post for one project. Unfortunately, with the popularity of hobby stores and imports of mass productions, the result can cheapen the ideas that are born in an artist’s studio. When your clients know the methods required for skilled handiwork, however, the more they can appreciate the outcome. This can result in more interest, sales, or support in your glass endeavors. Educate your customers or glass recipients so they can appreciate the work. If you are selling your work, set up a work space at a craft show and actually show potential customers part of your course of action.
  Colorado Artist Nancy Bonig, creator of the Victorian house on page 16, knows the benefit of showing her customers her tools and techniques. She gives demonstrations, talks, and workshops so that her customers understand why her art costs what it does. Nancy says, “With the mass production of ‘art’ from China and the Far East plus cutbacks in school funding for the arts, very few people are exposed to the processes involved in creating all forms of art, not just glass. I try to point out the steps with examples of the process and show them how to judge quality.” She feels that once she exposes her customers to her procedure by educating them, they become part of the process.
  You can use the pages of this magazine to strengthen your own case for the time and effort that it takes to create a stained glass panel, mosaic masterpiece, or fused phenomenon. Just find a project among our tutorials to show potential customers, students, and clients exactly what goes into the end result so they can appreciate the process.

Encouraging you to make great glass,

200x271GardenWaterLilies

Delynn Ellis
Managing Editor

 

      

 

                                        Garden Water Lilies by Christine Stewart



 

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Summer 2015     Something for Everyone-Designs in Your Favorite Glass Genre

Editorial              March 20, 2015

Ad Closing          April 20, 2015

Ad Materials       April 30, 2015

Fall 2015            Autumn,  Halloween,  Christmas,  and Holiday Ornaments
Editorial             June 20, 2015
Ad Closing         Junly 20, 2015
Ad Materials      July 30, 2015